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Jacques Grosset Interview

Dr. Jacques Grosset
Dr. Jacques Grosset

Dr. Jacques Grosset’s biography is excerpted from his staff page on the Johns Hopkins Medicine website.

Since the beginning of my professional life I have been involved in research to improve the control of tuberculosis, mainly by improving treatment of tuberculosis and preventing the development of drug resistance.

Tuberculosis was a leading cause of death in industrialized countries when I started my medical studies.

During the past 45 years, I have participated in the development of nearly all new drug regimens used for tuberculosis and a number of other mycobacterial diseases, namely leprosy, M. avium complex infection in HIV-infected persons, and M. ulcerans infection (Buruli ulcer). Using the murine experimental model, I directed the development of an antibiotic regimen that led to the first clinical that demonstrated the efficacy of this treatment for Buruli ulcer. I also participated in the design and evaluation of this trial. At present, my primary involvement is in the use of the mouse model to investigate the efficacy of new drugs and new drug combinations in human diseases caused by mycobacteria for improving both the efficacy of treatment and the implementation of Directly Observed Therapy (DOT).

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